Fast Recipes: Coconutty Energy Bites

A subscriber recently wrote to me: A friend of mine is on a fixed income and has maxed out his credit cards (nearing $10,000). He has started a new business, but currently has no customers or prospects. He is affirming that he is already successful and debt-free. What is the best way for him? Should he write checks to pay his bills as they arrive, even though the money may not be in his account at the moment? Wouldn’t these concrete actions demonstrate his faith?My Answer: Faith is a wonderful thing – and very necessary. There are, however, approaches that may look like faith but lead us in risky directions.

Please tell your friend that he needs to pay close attention to “real” actions and concentrate on learning to provide a service to other people that they want. (Note the emphasis is on what “they” want.) Paying bills with rubber checks isn’t an act of faith. It’s desperate gambling. I know from hard experience that it’s nearly impossible to get the right mindset for real faith or confidence when you’re circling the drain. Your friend needs to get his feet firmly under himself with real money — even if he has to go tend bar or wash dishes for the extra income for a bit. Honest, it’s no disgrace (unless he stays there).

Remember that all faith needs feet. If you’re in an airplane on its way down in a power dive, you put on your parachute first. And THEN you do affirmations. The old biblical phrase “faith without works is dead” means just that – belief needs to be connected organically with action. Productive action. If it’s not, then it’s not true belief, it’s only an attempt to con yourself and the gods.

Too many people hope that they can do affirmations or pray or ASSERT, and this will save them from having to make a decision and take action. But that’s not the way it works. Action and affirmations must be bonded together as a single unit and support each other like two legs. Neither faith nor action can stand alone.